5 Things Romans Were Famous For

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Even nowadays, after centuries, we owe so much to the Latin culture. Romans have been forerunners when it comes to law, engineering, and administration, but they also distinguished themselves in other remarkable fields, sometimes even deplorable ones such as corruption… Romans were famous for many MANY things, but let’s focus on 5. Read More

Tribe History: The Battle of Trebia – Hannibal takes on the Romans

The last time we talked about the legendary Hannibal and his activities during the Second Punic War, we took a look at the Battle of Zama, during which Hannibal was defeated by Scipio Africanus the elder.

When the Battle of Zama occurred, Hannibal was already a well-known general with a reputation. Let us take a look at one of his earlier battles: The Battle of Trebia was one of the first big military confrontations of the Second Punic War and took place in December of 218 BC. Read More

Tribe History: From Ballistas to Onagers: Roman Siege Warfare

Ancient armies usually met on the open field – the usual way to decide who would win the battle and often the sovereignty over a territory. While this form of warfare comes with its own special tactics, units, and strategies that are highly interesting, we will focus on another subject today: The Roman siege warfare. Read More

Tribe History: The Battle of Zama

When we think of famous generals throughout history, one of the few names that everybody seems to be able to list, is Hannibal. Everyone has a vague idea of what he did, that he waged war with the Roman Republic and used war elephants with which he traveled over the Pyrenees and the Alps into Italy.

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Food, glorious food: What did the Gauls eat?

What and how a society eats is at the very core of its culture. The farther removed that society is from us – be it through space or time, the less we know about it. As players of Travian we are of course highly interested in all aspects of the life of the real history counterparts of our tribes. So today, we ask: What did the Gauls eat?

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Tribe History: Why the Romans did not Conquer Germany

The Roman Republic and later the Roman Empire was one of the biggest, most powerful and most respected – or feared – Empires our world has ever seen. Still, the Romans never did conquer the whole of Germania, although they were quite actively trying, at least for some time. Read More

Caesar’s Civil War – Five years that changed Rome

This conflict, also known as the Great Roman Civil War, was the last internal conflict of the Roman Republic which transformed Rome into the Roman Empire. Read More

Tribe History: 3 of Rome’s Most Famous Military Tactics

The tactics of ancient Rome were so formidable for their time that, even after 2,000 years, military schools and colleges around the world still teach them. Although the organization of troops used by the Romans was predated by the Greeks of Macedonia, the Romans took this organization to whole a new level. Many would argue that the success was the standardization of equipment and training, including various commands which every unit immediately understood. Read More

Roman, it’s cold outside – What did the Romans wear?

As we take a look outside this festive season, we know to reach for our coats, hats and scarves to keep us warm. When we think about the Roman soldiers of old we have trouble picturing them in anything different than their typical sandal like boots, tunics and armor. In this edition of Tribe History, we take a look at what the Romans used to wear in the cold weather all those years ago! Read More

Tribe History – A Battle for the Ages: The Battle of the Teutoburg Forest

What happened in the Teutoburg Forest on the ninth of September in the year 9 CE, would one day be known as one of the most significant battles in the history of at least the Roman Empire and the Germanic tribes. It’s a story of cunning intrigue, tactical and political prowess as well as military strategy. The Battle of the Teutoburg Forest lead to the death or enslavement of about 35,000 Roman soldiers, with only about a thousand able to escape certain doom. Although the Germans were outnumbered two to one, they only had minimal losses. Read More